Elected Government Representative Māngai ā-Pōtitanga

Elected government representatives are elected by the people of a specific area to help govern a city, region or country.

Elected government representatives may do some or all of the following:

  • act on behalf of individuals or groups
  • study reports, proposals, complaints and petitions
  • present, debate and vote on new laws and policies 
  • attend meetings and public events, make speeches and give interviews
  • work with officials to develop policy.

Some elected government representatives also hold extra positions, such as junior or senior whip (who manage a political party's members of parliament).

Useful Experience

Useful experience for elected government representatives includes:

  • work as a local government representative
  • work as a union official or delegate
  • work for a political party or pressure group
  • debating experience.

Any work in economics, law, education or another specialist field, such as health or social work, is also useful.

Personal Qualities

Elected government representatives need to be:

  • trustworthy
  • motivated
  • confident
  • excellent communicators and debaters
  • skilled in making decisions
  • good at planning and organising
  • able to evaluate and interpret information
  • able to inspire confidence and trust in others.

Useful Experience

Useful experience for elected government representatives includes:

  • work as a local government representative
  • work as a union official or delegate
  • work for a political party or pressure group
  • debating experience.

Any work in economics, law, education or another specialist field, such as health or social work, is also useful.

Subject Recommendations

There are no specific secondary education requirements to become an elected government representative. However, te reo Māori, English, economics, and social studies are useful.

Elected Government Representatives can earn around $160K-$300K per year per year.

Elected government representatives may progress to become senior representatives of their council or political party.

Elected government representatives may specialise as a:

Member of Parliament
Members of parliament (MPs) represent the electorate in the House of Representatives (parliament). There are 70 electorate MPs, chosen by voters in the area, and 50 list MPs.
Local Government Representative
Local government representatives form a council, which includes a mayor or chairperson, or a community board. There are also local body board members, who represent the electorate on boards such as district health boards.
Elected Government Representative

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